Steve Bryson, PhD, science writer —

Steve holds a PhD in biochemistry from the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Toronto, Canada. As a medical scientist for 18 years, he worked in both academia and industry, where his research focused on the discovery of new vaccines and medicines to treat inflammatory disorders and infectious diseases. Steve is a published author in multiple peer-reviewed scientific journals and a patented inventor.

Articles by Steve Bryson

Noninvasive spinal cord stimulation may help SMA motor function

A two-week course of transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation (tSCS), a noninvasive method of stimulating the spinal cord using electrical impulses, can improve motor function, breathing, and knee motion in people with spinal muscular atrophy types 2 and 3, a study suggests. “Further studies are needed to elucidate the reasons…

LTFU model helps SMA families, clinicians, NBS programs: Study

A program designed to provide data and tools for people with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) identified through newborn screening (NBS) can help families and clinicians engage with public health agencies and ensure the best possible outcomes, a study found. The Long-Term Follow-up Cares and Check Initiative (LTFU-Cares and…

Protein a potential biomarker of Spinraza treatment responses

In adults with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), changes in the bloodstream in the levels of a protein called LARGE1 matched treatment responses to Spinraza (nusinersen), a study suggested. Further, LARGE1 levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) — the liquid that surrounds the brain and spinal cord — were also…

Combining 2 SMA therapies boosts SMN protein production: Study

Combining a low dose of risdiplam, the active ingredient in Evrysdi, with a therapy like Spinraza (nusinersen) boosted SMN protein production beyond what the individual treatments do in cells from spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) patients, a study shows. The low-dose combination demonstrated synergistic benefits while minimizing the…

Early treatment may not resolve swallowing problems in SMA: Study

Children with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) can still experience swallowing difficulties despite early treatment with disease-modifying therapies, a small study shows. Swallowing was either incomplete, with liquid remaining in the mouth and/or esophagus, and/or unsafe due to aspiration (the inhalation of liquid into the lungs), in all of the…

Previously unknown breathing abnormality seen in SMA type 2

A previously unknown breathing problem — called pseudo-obstructive sleep-disordered breathing — has been discovered among people with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) type 2, a study reveals. This unusual breathing pattern during sleep is caused by an imbalance between the SMA-related weakness in the chest muscles and the relatively unaffected…