Steve Bryson, PhD, science writer —

Steve holds a PhD in biochemistry from the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Toronto, Canada. As a medical scientist for 18 years, he worked in both academia and industry, where his research focused on the discovery of new vaccines and medicines to treat inflammatory disorders and infectious diseases. Steve is a published author in multiple peer-reviewed scientific journals and a patented inventor.

Articles by Steve Bryson

In Real World, Adherence Low to Spinraza Treatment, Data Show

A significant proportion of people with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) do not remain on Spinraza (nusinersen) or receive treatment injections as prescribed, according to a U.S. insurance claims analysis. “SMA can be treated, but it is important that patients receive their scheduled doses of medicine as prescribed and…

Prenatal Blood Test Accurately Gauges SMA Risk

UNITY Screen, a noninvasive prenatal blood test, can provide an accurate personalized risk assessment for hereditary diseases such as spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) in fetuses, according to a recent study. Offered by BillionToOne in the U.S., the single-gene noninvasive prenatal test (sgNIPT) included in UNITY Screen requires…

Scoliosis Progression Detailed in Untreated SMA Type 2 Children

Severe scoliosis — an abnormal curvature of the spine — was significantly associated with older age and limited motor abilities in children with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) type 2 who had not received disease-modifying therapies, a study showed. These findings establish characteristics of untreated scoliosis progression on SMA type…

Long-term Spinraza Treatment Found to Help SMA Teens, Adults

Up to 4.5 years of Spinraza (nusinersen) treatment led to meaningful improvements in motor function in adolescents and adults with spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), according to a medical records analysis. “[Spinraza] was effective in long-term follow-up,” researchers wrote. Noting a dearth of data on Spinraza’s long-term effectiveness among…

Lack of Suspicion by Doctors May Lead to Delayed Diagnosis in SMA

A delayed diagnosis in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) may occur in many cases due to the absence of clinical suspicion of the rare genetic disorder, an interview-based study concluded. In particular, treating physicians of pediatric patients often disregarded or misinterpreted signs reported by parents, leading to diagnostic delays, the…

In SBMA, Cold Temperatures Slow Nerve Impulses to Arm Muscles

Men with spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) had slower nerve impulses leading to their forearm muscles when their arms were exposed to cold temperatures, a small study reported. These slower impulses correlated with reduced hand grip strength, and were significantly longer in adults with muscle weakness at cold…